Tag Archives: transgender

YAM Magazine’s 2012 LGBT Blogathon Begins June 11th

A great promotional opportunity for those who are or support GLBTIIQ interests:

“Just like last year YAM celebrated Pride Month during the first week of June, with their first EVER LGBT Blogathon event, and the YAM Magazine team is proud to announce that they’re back at it!

Same rules apply! You can talk about ANYTHING entertainment (that goes for film, television, music, books, or anything else you can think of…) that is related to LGBT themes. From anywhere in the world, in any language.

Join them on June 11th – June 17th to share the best of worldwide LGBT entertainment.”

Visit YAM’s website for more details.

Join them!

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Filed under Events, Gay Interest, GLBTIIQ Interest

The Stories Old Photos Tell: Visualizing Your Characters in Writing

Their Photo by Red Haircrow

Out wandering one Sunday morning, having promised to take my son to the traditional weekend institutions in Germany, namely flea markets, we returned to one of our favorites in Berlin at Rathaus Steglitz. It’s my favorite because there’s a vendor specializing in old books, postcards, letters and photos. I can literally take hours going through all boxes and boxes of material, but a 14 year old has little interest beyond the cursory. So, randomly choosing ONE box to go through, after considering to buy a number of postcards from the early 1900′s, and a newer one with the image of a kitten, I decided to go deeper, and I was lucky I did…for I found the perfect photo for my next project.

It was absolutely perfect.

It immediately drew my eye despite its small size and slightly out of focus nature: a tall dark-haired man walked besides three others in a nature landscape with trees on either side. They are casual in dress shirts and sweaters, two distinctly have jackets that look homemade, but its the positioning of the men, the way they look into the camera that is so arresting.

The time period could be anywhere from the late 50s to mid-70s, but I would guess it to be perhaps early 60′s. On the back of the photo there is a pencil written number but it could be interpreted as a quickly written “55″ or flipped around “39″. It’s also stamped with a violet ink mark saying: “Foto-Boss 11/15 Trept, Puschkinallee1″.

Whatever the date, two of these individuals are my muse for a literary novel tentatively titled “Zero Hour”. If you don’t know that term, it’s suggestive of the base state many Germans, Jews and others who survived WW2 came to following the monumental slaughter of millions, violence and devastation, both personal and societal, greater than any experienced in recent history. They came to an absolute state where there was total nothingness, zero, and had to somehow rebuild their sanity, their lives, their world.

My story is based on a young person who never felt comfortable in their gender. Growing up during this time period, in a small village in Germany where anyone different could be considered dangerous, he lived a mentally and physically precarious life, yet maintained an odd friendship with another older children who was a mix of protector and challenger. Nearing the end of war, they, like the rest, were broken and forced apart until several years later they met in Berlin.

Despite being overjoyed to see one another again, the scars the war left on each are deep, with some still healing. New wounds are sustained as one needs to express his sexuality and desire for change, and the other is both repulsed and attracted by the courageous struggle of his friend, yet their tumultuous feelings for each other may cause the death each had previously escaped.

I’m a long time student and researcher of the Holocaust and world war two era Germany; the precendents which led up to the events and the various hardships that occurred during its rebuilding. This is a project I’ve planned for several years, wishing to incorporate my knowledge of the people and their times, as well as the unique, often deadly situation homosexuals and others, especially transgenders or intergenders found themselves in both before and after the war.

(Side note: I recently met and became friends with a young man here in Berlin who, among other things, volunteers at the Gay Museum in Mehringdamm, Berlin. As we discussed this project, his enthusiasm for the history he works with every day really fired my own for telling this story, and accurately portraying local and gay history in this way.)

It is a story in which my own struggles will be situationally included. Often considered a “bittersweet” author, this fits within some of my usual themes of internal battle, inexplicable love and heartbreak and healing.The nature of the photo conveyed this same mood for me.

We don’t know where they came from or where they’re going, or their relationship to each other, save they appear to be on quite familiar terms and are likely friends. The two central figures in the photo are the basis for my main characters. As soon as I saw them at the bottom of the cardboard box I knew they had to be mine. I could sink myself into the image and look out from their eyes:

I am the shorter figure, I could look left up to the taller form of my friend. I trail him just a bit, glad to be near but not obtrusively close. I feel a small shiver of excitement to be photoed this way next to him. I don’t want to smile too widely and appear forward, but my pleasure shows on my face and the relaxed set of my shoulders.

I am the taller figure. If I glance down to my right I can see him just in the corner of my eye. I am out front, the leader, the protector, one hand unencumbered to reach out and help if necessary, or hold him back with caution while I assess any coming situation. My head tilts just enough to show a mild exasperation with the photo taker. I can’t do anything but submit but I would have preferred not to be in the photo. We are only walking after all, so why take it?

I love old photos. I love the stories they can tell. I love to immerse myself into them, into other people, feel their feelings and express it through my writing. Sometimes I become them. With the old, old photos I have, I know the people are dead now, but I make them live again inside my head. Some of the characters in my stories are incarnations of myself, the situations based on actual events, while the two individuals from “Zero Hour” are, I believe, those who actually existed somewhere in time…and I found them again through their photo.

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Filed under Writers and Writing

She’s My Dad by Iolanthe Woulff

Review: The author’s personal knowledge of the subject matter was instrumental in creating and establishing a believable, sympathetic character whose internal thoughts, struggles and motivations could help discerning readers better understand the unique yet understandable complexities of many transgendered people. That being said, conversely, for many who consider themselves transgendered, the choice is really a simple one. It is other people’s reactions that can be the more difficult part to deal with.

I felt there was a clear aim the author wished to achieve, but at times I found the narrative portions of the story overly descriptive, weighting and slowing the story down unnecessarily. It reminded me of the official description itself. Sometimes there is so much we are enthusiastic about, and feel so passionately to present we try to include it all. As a writer, I can’t say I haven’t done it because I have, but sometimes it’s a little weighty.

One thing I believe too many people seem to forget about fiction works such as “She’s My Dad” are that they are sometimes very much based on personal experience and knowledge. Just because they are fictional in presentation, does not make the emotions, situations and experiences any less true. And not that some writers who haven’t experienced the same can’t produce a creditable work about transgenderism, for me, it is crucially important when someone who has can so very poignantly present a story that is fiction yet in many ways is real. I can certainly see why this title was nominated for the Next Generation Indie Book Awards in the GLBT category in 2010.

Note: Although do understand the differentiation for GLBT because it’s just a fact it’s a category too often overlooked in awards because of the initial premise, I do think it should be able to have presentation and representation in whatever category listed on its own merits. There are many great works out there from and about GLBTIIQ people yet they are too seldom truly acknowledged.

Otherwise, as an intergendered person, all too often confused with transgenderism, although some similar feelings have been expressed by each, this was a curious book for me to read and review. It took many several attempts to start it, and to finish it, but that is nothing about the work itself but rather the feelings it can “engender.”

Description: “Don’t hate, Nicholas. Hate destroys everything. Don’t let it destroy you…”

For decades, ultra-liberal Windfield College has been a thorn in the side of Northern Virginia’s hidebound elite. When a teaching position unexpectedly becomes available, the school hires a former male graduate – now a transsexual woman named Nickie Farrell – as an assistant professor of English. Hoping to find peace, Nickie keeps her secret under wraps until ambitious lesbian student reporter Cinda Vanderhart outs her. And Cinda has noticed something else: both Nickie and a young townie waiter named Collie Skinner have a genetic quirk which causes their eyes to be different colors. Convinced that the similarity is no coincidence, Cinda begins an investigation to discover the connection between them.

Meanwhile, in a death-bed confession as she succumbs to years of brutality at the hands of her disgraced cop husband, Collie’s mother Luanne reveals that his birth resulted from an illicit affair she had with a long-vanished Windfield college senior named Nick Farrington. Shattered by his mother’s death, Collie turns for comfort to Robin Thompson, a gentle-hearted Christian co-worker at the upper-crust Foxton Arms restaurant. As Nickie is stalked by a pair of homicidal sociopaths, Robin finds herself entangled not only in Cinda’s investigative machinations but also a murderous plot by former U.S Ambassador and tycoon Eamon Douglass to eradicate the hated college with a suicide detonation of a Cesium 137 dirty bomb. Lives and secrets hang in the balance until everything comes to a head on the morning of Windfield’s annual spring picnic: April Fools Day.

Filled with richly-drawn characters and building to a stunning climax, SHE’S MY DAD is a story about the destructiveness of hate, the power of love, and the redemptive triumph of good over evil.

Like her title character Nickie Farrell, Iolanthe Woulff is a transsexual woman. A fifty-nine-year-old Princeton-educated English major, she lives in Palm Springs, CA, where for several years she wrote a column in a local magazine about the challenges of gender transition. As the eldest child of author Herman Wouk, storytelling has always been dear to Ms. Woulff’s heart. Her hope is that besides providing a suspenseful read, SHE’S MY DAD will help to dispel some of the widespread misconceptions about transsexual people.

Kindle Edition
Published November 13th 2009 by Outskirts Press, Inc.
ASIN: B0030EG3HW
Source: Author
literary awards

Author Bio:

 

Iolanthe “Lannie” Woulff came into the world as a male during the fifth year of the Truman presidency, which means that she is rapidly acquiring the status of an antique. In 1958 her family moved from Manhattan to the island of St. Thomas, which in those days was a sparsely-populated tropical dot in the Caribbean. There “Nate”, as Lannie was known in those days, spent several idyllic years gleefully swinging from jungle vines and swimming on the world’s most beautiful unspoiled beaches. She treasures many poignant memories of that lost paradise, which, alas, is no longer.

Moving back to the mainland in 1964, Lannie attended The Maret School in Washington, D.C. As the Vietnam War raged and protest movements convulsed the nation, she gained admission to Princeton, and after escaping the inaugural Selective Service lottery by a scant fourteen points, graduated in 1973 with a degree in English. For several ensuing years she lived in New York City and worked for her uncle, who was then developing an early prototype hybrid vehicle. That was during the Studio 54 era, the so-called “Me Decade”, which Lannie experienced at full throttle while writing a coming-of-age novel which fortunately remained unpublished.

In 1980, at the urging of her younger brother, she moved to Israel, where together they opened a diving business on the Red Sea. When the Lebanon War wiped out the tourist trade and with it their business, she returned stateside to raise pedigreed Black Angus cows on a family farm in northern Virginia’s famous Hunt Country. The rolling hills and pastoral beauty of that area provide the setting for SHE’S MY DAD.

Succumbing to the lure of the West in 1987, she finally settled for good in the California resort town of Palm Springs. Ten years later, fulfilling a lifelong imperative, Lannie commenced the complex and emotionally turbulent process of gender transition. During the process she authored a column called “The T Dance” in one of the local LGBT magazines, before turning her attention full-time to fiction writing.

Now happily (and legally) married to her soul mate Joleene, Lannie is the proud parent of a beautiful and accomplished daughter, loves to tease her generic tabby cat Xena, and looks forward to weekly strolls in the desert sunshine with her eminent father, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Herman Wouk.

SHE’S MY DAD is Lannie’s debut effort. Believing that one must always retain a sense of humor, she is writing another novel.

Website: http://www.iolanthewoulff.com

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Stoned Honor by Faith Folau

Review: An authentic voice using, what I’ve come to understand as the local “cant,” Stoned Honor is one woman’s path to finding herself after escape from a life of pain, sometimes self-inflicted, but more often because of circumstance or at the hands of others. From a beginning of indigenous Islander birth, through a history of prostitution, drugs, and violence, this memoir contains the type of reflections that can be dangerous in that perpetrators don’t want their wrongdoings revealed, but some things must come to the light. They must be revealed, and as it’s Faith Folau’s confession of sorts, it is hers to tell.

First off I’ll say her and hers, woman throughout, because that’s how it should be. Some people, perhaps simply by definition, insist on using words like transgender, transsexual, transwoman in placement of those words. I believe part of the issues that continue to promote separatism based on sexuality is because some people separate others into a category of their own choosing irregardless of the person’s wishes. Certainly, they might be applicable descriptive terms, to be sure, but that is not the essence of the person themselves.

The family photos were a nice touch and helped me immerse myself a little more as they created a deeper sense of connection. Faith’s early days reminded me of my family, who are Native American, and after coming into the city from a very “indigenous” way of life in the mountains, the unique hardships and vices of city life nearly destroyed a generation and continue to be problematic.

I identified with so much of Faith’s story: the avoiding of family gatherings because people like to remember and laugh at the bad, embarassing things when you were young, the inevitable arguments and fights that might occur, of how the “secret sins” over the years cause rifts that are sometimes never healed because the other party nurses their venom. For the spiritual aspects of the memoir, I had to take them as part of the whole, part of the person writing them though they are quite opposite to my own beliefs and views of Christianity.

“Stoned Honor” is special. It is honesty and defiance told in a forthright, sincere tone that moves back and forth along Faith’s personal timeline. Although my life had a different slant, I could well understand Faith’s expression, the necessity of dual or triple “faces”, how you act, what you say, what you are, just to survive. I also know the “zero hour” when you have to leave all of that behind, burn it away or as a “brittle piece of paper to crush in the hand,” give it to the winds. This book, this personal revelation is very much an example of when you have to look pass the differences in wording and spelling into the “heart of the matter” to read what the author is trying to share. I know personally how hard it can be to do so, but also how very important is for the body, mind and soul to achieve true freedom from the past.

Description: I FEEL NO PAIN Here is the outcome for the future, because yesterday I was bitter, today I’m grown. The past should never be brought to the light of day, but because I was writing a book about my life I decided to put all the things that had hard memory, like it was the day it had happened. It was in consideration to be all brought back into this book. If you think that I feel the same way I do, as you read, I don’t. I hold now weight of life’s problems in my heart.

Genre: Memoir

Published in print and ebook formats at Lulu.com.

Published: 4 January 2011

Source: Self-purchase

From the Author

As a transsexual women, we have been thourgh a lot. Especially born and raised on Hawaii, we are last and sometimes not even cared about. I also talk about religion, sex, employment, etc.

Reading my journey is like reading about every transsexual women in the Islands. I can’t say fully because everyone is different, and go through life on different roads. But I can speak for most. Being sexual slaves just to survive. Read more to find out more.

Interview with Ms. Folau

Greetings, today I am interviewing Faith Folau, a native Hawaiian, part-time dominatrix and author of the memoir “Stoned Honor”. It is the story of one transgender woman’s goal to stamp out pain and replace it will happiness. It is a past many of us have shared, and a healing journey we walk daily.  Available in hardcover, paperback and electronic file, published 4 January 2011.

 What was your first published work? When was it written and/or published?

My first book ever was ‘The beginning to an end of a “Bad girl.’  It was published on December 20 2010, but within a week later, I pulled it from being sold.  I revised it because of a privacy violation, and then shortly after the book had a new title and a new cover jacket:“Stoned Honor.”

At what age did you develop an interest in writing? Did you ever ask or let your parents read your work?  I ask that because as an eleven year old I read some of my poetry for my parents and received a very negative response. I didn’t let anyone else read my work for almost twenty years.

I started to write when I was 11 years old also. My early work was songs and poems that I kept to myself. I was afraid to show anyone because they might make fun of me.  Especially the love songs that I used to write, I did not want anyone to see them. Today I have no idea where all those writings are.  So no, my parents didn’t ask or see my writings.

After that, I started a diary and then blogs on the internet.  I would watch music awards on TV and later write my thoughts on the awards shows, and post them onto the internet on forums.
What or who were some of the bands and you liked best?

In the 90’s I listened to Mary J. Blige, Faith Evans, Salt’n’Pepa, Lil’Kim, Foxy Brown and many others who are not around any more.

Do you have a specific genre in which you write? What are some of your themes?

Well, when I write I don’t really think of a genre. I just start writing from my experience, the things that I went and am still going through.  I guess you can say I write fiction in the biography genre.  This year I am going to push my writing towards erotica.  I will for now stick to what I know, and that is memoirs and erotica.

How would you describe your writing style? To whom would you compare your work?

My writing style comes rolling right off the top of my brain.  Therefore, if I have a writing style it would be a personal style.  A personal style from words of the brains, of me.  A style of words everyone can understand.  As for comparing my written words to someone, there would be no one. I am the narrator.

Your memoir, Stoned Honor, is available now, would you tell us what it’s about?

Before I was a bad girl. I did what I had to do to survive in the streets of Hawaii.  I grew up in church so I knew that there was a higher power out there that I believed in.  However, discrimination all over our Island forced me into picking a career, an industry that involved nude modelling.  After all that, I chose to hold my self higher than nude modelling and sought God for help.

My goal was stay alive and keep positive in my life. It worked. I found many answers in life that took me so long to find out, just simply by going the spiritual route.  In my book, I explain how I kept positive things around me and because of it, I was able to write and publish my book in 30 days.

Please tell us a little more about your background, and what your philosophy of life means.

Growing up in a very strict Hawaiian family that was poor to the bone.  Most times hunting on the land for food and fishing in the oceans was necessary in order to keep from starving.  Going to school and church was a high demand growing up, and if you did not attend, you would be punished.  Punishment from a very abusive grandfather who thought that hard-core beatings was a form of talk.

Everyone has enemies but it’s your job not to acknowledge them with the same feed back they give you, instead show them love and kindness. Because I have dealt with envy and competition all of my life.  As TS (transsexual) women there are other transgender out there that feel the need to compete with everyone, and in my case, it almost turned into a violent situation.  In addition, I was able to save my self from hurt, harm and danger by praying and being three steps ahead of jealousy.

I was able to save my self from suicide from a very abusive father.  My father was a local boxer and taking his fist full force to my face many times since the 3rd grade made me think about suicide.  Everyone was afraid of him so they could not help me, not my mother and not my siblings.  My mother was much brained washed from my father making her think that it was ok to try to convert me with abuse.  He also told her that if I do not change my girly ways he would leave.  Therefore, she let him abuse me, so that her children would have a father around.

In addition, all of this had led to alcohol abuse, divorce, adultery, and violence in the family.  I talk about this in the chapter “Family Affair”, in Stoned Honor.

Now please understand that I do not go into self-pity, I want to share my stories because I know there are people out there going through the same things.  I gave you my stories, and I gave you solutions on what and how to knock out all these negative situations before you do something crazy to yourself.  If it has helped me, I hope my words can help other as well, kids and adult.

I thank you for sharing your experiences. I, in no way, feel it is self-pity of any kind, but rather a courageous declaration. As a survivor of many abuses myself, I know how hard it can be to reach the point to speak of it, and how much harder it is to relive it in order to write a memoir and remain strong.

As a person who survived multiple suicide attempts when I was younger, I love your message of speaking about yourself, from your wisdom, in order to help those suffering through similar feelings. Like you, it is a natural feeling for me to say of what helped me, and to hope it might help others.



Do you currently have any writing projects or works in progress?

I feel like stoned honor was an inspirational and positive book.  Now I am going to talk about my experiences with a more adult genre. I would say this next book is more than erotica, but at the same time, I want to keep this next book in a positive light.  As well as continuing to write articles of everyday life on my blogs.

I wish you good luck with that. I believe erotica, whether fiction or a revealing of personal occurrences can help provide a window into another person’s mind and life which can help others. In particular, understanding that you are a transgender woman, I believe your work would help shed very important light on people who continue to be somewhat misunderstood by others.

You are also an independent publishing author. What made you publish independently versus publishing with a traditional house?


With Stoned Honor I went independent because I do not think you need a book contract to get your words out there for the world to read.  In addition, I wanted Stoned Honor to be an e-book mainly because it is a short book, about 60 pages.  I could not really go into every topic, as I wanted to, because even though Hawaii is a part of the United States, we still have our own laws.  I had to really watch what I was putting in the book because Hawaiian families have their own beliefs, and if I took it far, I would face either death or being abandoned my family.   In addition, that is how the story came about, because in some races if a women talks about sexuality or experiences it, she would get stoned to death.  In addition, the “honor” part (of the title) came because if stoning happened to me, I would take it in honor.

As for my next book, I want this one to be published with a house.  It is going to be 300 to 400 pages long.  However, I am not going to wait for a house to pick me up, if I have to than I am going to publish it myself.

Telling one’s own story, as I am working at through my memoir “The Boys Who Died”, can very well bring retribution from one’s tribe or people. In my tribe, stoning to death is still utilized also. Being shunned and abandoned, not able to return to your home on pain of death, is still applicable for some “wrongdoing”, which can include aspects of sexuality which one has no control over.


Where are some of the places we can find you online?

Like most people, I am on Facebook at Faith Folau.  Find me on twitter @ reality_blogs.  My website www.faithfolau.webs.com, and my blog spot http://faithfolau.blogspot.com/ where all my articles can be found.  I also have my mistress website at www.tskimiko.webs.com .

Please visit Queer Magazine Online to see the first and full posting of Faith’s review.

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Filed under Memoir, Non-Fiction, Reviews

Memoirist Faith Folau, on her story “Stoned Honor”

Greetings, today I am interviewing Faith Folau, a native Hawaiian, part-time dominatrix and author of the memoir “Stoned Honor”. It is the story of one transgender woman’s goal to stamp out pain and replace it will happiness. It is a past many of us have shared, and a healing journey we walk daily.  Available in hardcover, paperback and electronic file, published 4 January 2011.


What was your first published work? When was it written and/or published?

My first book ever was ‘The beginning to an end of a “Bad girl.’  It was published on December 20 2010, but within a week later, I pulled it from being sold.  I revised it because of a privacy violation, and then shortly after the book had a new title and a new cover jacket:“Stoned Honor.”

At what age did you develop an interest in writing? Did you ever ask or let your parents read your work?  I ask that because as an eleven year old I read some of my poetry for my parents and received a very negative response. I didn’t let anyone else read my work for almost twenty years.

I started to write when I was 11 years old also. My early work was songs and poems that I kept to myself. I was afraid to show anyone because they might make fun of me.  Especially the love songs that I used to write, I did not want anyone to see them. Today I have no idea where all those writings are.  So no, my parents didn’t ask or see my writings.

After that, I started a diary and then blogs on the internet.  I would watch music awards on TV and later write my thoughts on the awards shows, and post them onto the internet on forums.
What or who were some of the bands and you liked best?

In the 90’s I listened to Mary J. Blige, Faith Evans, Salt’n’Pepa, Lil’Kim, Foxy Brown and many others who are not around any more.

Do you have a specific genre in which you write? What are some of your themes?

Well, when I write I don’t really think of a genre. I just start writing from my experience, the things that I went and am still going through.  I guess you can say I write fiction in the biography genre.  This year I am going to push my writing towards erotica.  I will for now stick to what I know, and that is memoirs and erotica.

How would you describe your writing style? To whom would you compare your work?

My writing style comes rolling right off the top of my brain.  Therefore, if I have a writing style it would be a personal style.  A personal style from words of the brains, of me.  A style of words everyone can understand.  As for comparing my written words to someone, there would be no one. I am the narrator.

Your memoir, Stoned Honor, is available now, would you tell us what it’s about?

Before I was a bad girl. I did what I had to do to survive in the streets of Hawaii.  I grew up in church so I knew that there was a higher power out there that I believed in.  However, discrimination all over our Island forced me into picking a career, an industry that involved nude modelling.  After all that, I chose to hold my self higher than nude modelling and sought God for help.

My goal was stay alive and keep positive in my life. It worked. I found many answers in life that took me so long to find out, just simply by going the spiritual route.  In my book, I explain how I kept positive things around me and because of it, I was able to write and publish my book in 30 days.

Please tell us a little more about your background, and what your philosophy of life means.

Growing up in a very strict Hawaiian family that was poor to the bone.  Most times hunting on the land for food and fishing in the oceans was necessary in order to keep from starving.  Going to school and church was a high demand growing up, and if you did not attend, you would be punished.  Punishment from a very abusive grandfather who thought that hard-core beatings was a form of talk.

Everyone has enemies but it’s your job not to acknowledge them with the same feed back they give you, instead show them love and kindness. Because I have dealt with envy and competition all of my life.  As TS (transsexual) women there are other transgender out there that feel the need to compete with everyone, and in my case, it almost turned into a violent situation.  In addition, I was able to save my self from hurt, harm and danger by praying and being three steps ahead of jealousy.

I was able to save my self from suicide from a very abusive father.  My father was a local boxer and taking his fist full force to my face many times since the 3rd grade made me think about suicide.  Everyone was afraid of him so they could not help me, not my mother and not my siblings.  My mother was much brained washed from my father making her think that it was ok to try to convert me with abuse.  He also told her that if I do not change my girly ways he would leave.  Therefore, she let him abuse me, so that her children would have a father around.

In addition, all of this had led to alcohol abuse, divorce, adultery, and violence in the family.  I talk about this in the chapter “Family Affair”, in Stoned Honor.

Now please understand that I do not go into self-pity, I want to share my stories because I know there are people out there going through the same things.  I gave you my stories, and I gave you solutions on what and how to knock out all these negative situations before you do something crazy to yourself.  If it has helped me, I hope my words can help other as well, kids and adult.

I thank you for sharing your experiences. I, in no way, feel it is self-pity of any kind, but rather a courageous declaration. As a survivor of many abuses myself, I know how hard it can be to reach the point to speak of it, and how much harder it is to relive it in order to write a memoir and remain strong.

As a person who survived multiple suicide attempts when I was younger, I love your message of speaking about yourself, from your wisdom, in order to help those suffering through similar feelings. Like you, it is a natural feeling for me to say of what helped me, and to hope it might help others.



Do you currently have any writing projects or works in progress?

I feel like stoned honor was an inspirational and positive book.  Now I am going to talk about my experiences with a more adult genre. I would say this next book is more than erotica, but at the same time, I want to keep this next book in a positive light.  As well as continuing to write articles of everyday life on my blogs.

I wish you good luck with that. I believe erotica, whether fiction or a revealing of personal occurrences can help provide a window into another person’s mind and life which can help others. In particular, understanding that you are a transgender woman, I believe your work would help shed very important light on people who continue to be somewhat misunderstood by others.

You are also an independent publishing author. What made you publish independently versus publishing with a traditional house?


With Stoned Honor I went independent because I do not think you need a book contract to get your words out there for the world to read.  In addition, I wanted Stoned Honor to be an e-book mainly because it is a short book, about 60 pages.  I could not really go into every topic, as I wanted to, because even though Hawaii is a part of the United States, we still have our own laws.  I had to really watch what I was putting in the book because Hawaiian families have their own beliefs, and if I took it far, I would face either death or being abandoned my family.   In addition, that is how the story came about, because in some races if a women talks about sexuality or experiences it, she would get stoned to death.  In addition, the “honor” part (of the title) came because if stoning happened to me, I would take it in honor.

As for my next book, I want this one to be published with a house.  It is going to be 300 to 400 pages long.  However, I am not going to wait for a house to pick me up, if I have to than I am going to publish it myself.

Telling one’s own story, as I am working at through my memoir “The Boys Who Died”, can very well bring retribution from one’s tribe or people. In my tribe, stoning to death is still utilized also. Being shunned and abandoned, not able to return to your home on pain of death, is still applicable for some “wrongdoing”, which can include aspects of sexuality which one has no control over.

What good things have you experienced with independent publishing? Have you had any problems?
It is so easy to be able to put your work out there for people to read. In addition, I like the work that I put in it keeps me productive everyday, so that is the good for me.  Moreover, I had no problems.

Would you suggest other authors self-publish? Why or why not?

Amanda Hocking, she has sold thousands of e-books, and at the time, she was self-published.  Now she has been picked up by a publishing house and has a contract.  Therefore, I suggest her because if she can continue to sell, then her books must be worth it. http://amandahocking.blogspot.com/

Would you care to tell us something about yourself personally?
You all must know by now that I am a pre-op transsexual woman.  I am not afraid to say that I am.  Besides a writer, I am a part time dominatrix.  My next book will be experience from that. 

What kind of books do you like to read? Do you have any hobbies or past-times?
I love to read documentaries on celebrities or real ghost documentary. I try to read non-fiction, but on the back of my mind, I know it is not real.  I want to read a book that has truth.Besides reading as a hobby and past time, I love to cook and bake.  I spend time with family very often.  I love to have talks with them about life.  I love a good conversation or debate.
Thanks for the interview, Faith. I’ve enjoyed getting to know you and hope others have as well. Where are some of the places we can find you online?

Like most people, I am on Facebook at Faith Folau.  Find me on twitter @ reality_blogs.  My website www.faithfolau.webs.com, and my blog spot http://faithfolau.blogspot.com/ where all my articles can be found.  I also have my mistress website at www.tskimiko.webs.com .

This interview was originally posted at Swedish website, Queer Magazine Online.

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