Tag Archives: poetry

Coming March 17th: “CORE”, Selected Poems by Red Haircrow

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Poetry » American poetry » Native American

Published by Flying With Red Haircrow

Published: Available March 17, 2014

Words: 5,340

Language: American English

ISBN: 9781311903570

Price: $4.99

“CORE is a poetry collection with themes of suicide, loss and grief, but also of courage, joy and deeply passionate love. It is a journey of healing and survival that has taken the author around the world and through his own heart and spirit. It is the revealing of darkness and light, of beauty and hideousness, and a reliance on the strength of one’s ancestors and their beliefs to inspire hope and perseverance.”

Readers appreciative of contemporary poetry written by a Native American poet who has traveled the world and the broad spectrum of life may be interested in the forty plus poems written in a variety of styles and meters. Delivered from a unique perspective, sometimes dark and powerful, and at others whimsically gentle, work by Red Haircrow has often been described as “unforgettable and haunting.”

Core will be available at Smashwords & its distributors, and other online sources.

Editorial Reviews:

“There is no doubt Red Haircrow has a gift for descriptive prose; the vivid imagery the author presents through the selection of language sketches a picture for the reader that is rich in feeling and atmosphere.”Top2Bottom Reviews

“Inspirational, often poignant, occasionally brutal…”— Bob Cherny, The LL Book Reviews

“I read this collection with a sense of wonder, humility and inspiration and the writing deeply touched me on a multitude of levels.”Indie Reviews

“To make something so beautiful out of pain and struggle is the highest meaning of what I believe art is: transforming hurt and becoming healers.”Ana Christina Caelen, Sound therapist, Musician and Composer

“It makes me think, makes me feel, enables me to travel to different places without leaving the comfort of my easy chair.”– Nancy Ferrer, Outlaw Reviews

Author Profile:

Red Haircrow is an award-winning author of fiction and non-fiction, poet, private chef and former law enforcement officer of Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee descent who lives in Berlin, Germany. Red is also a psychological counselor, publicist and owner of the multi-media entity Flying With Red Haircrow.

Red Haircrow has various poems, shorter works and articles published in magazines like Sword & Saga Press’ American Athenaeum, Sibling Rivalry Press’ Assaracus, Danse Macabre, and Indian Country Today Media Network.

Awards include: Rainbow Award 2012 Best LGBT Biography/Memoir for “Silence Is Multi-Colored In My World”. Winner Global Ebook 2013 Awards Best LGBT Fiction for “The Agony of Joy”, Finalist Rainbow Awards 2013 Best LBT Fiction, “The Agony of Joy.”

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My Poetry in Assaracus Magazine, Issue 9 from Sibling Rivalry Press Coming Jan 10th, 2013

Publishing on January 10th 2013, a few days after I turn 41, my poetry will appear starting on page 41 of Assaracus Magazine, Issue 9. I consider that a good sign for the coming year.

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“BEST NEW MAGAZINE” – LIBRARY JOURNAL (May 2012):

“…Sibling Rivalry Press is publishing well-wrought, challenging literature that provides deep insight into the broad range of emotional experiences of being gay…”

Assaracus: A Journal of Gay Poetry
ISSN: 2159-0478
Bryan Borland, Publisher/Editor
Seth Pennington, Associate Editor
Published in January, April, July, October
http://siblingrivalrypress.com/assaracus/

Assaracus is the only print journal in the world dedicated to poetry of gay men. Each issue of Assaracus features a substantial portfolio of work by ten-to-twelve emerging or established gay poets.

SUBSCRIBE TO ASSARACUS OR PURCHASE ISSUES (PRE-ORDER OPTION STARTS November 26)

SUBSCRIBE TO ASSARACUS: Readers worldwide can subscribe to receive a year of Assaracus. Unless you specify otherwise, your subscription begins with our current issue. Subscription price is $50.00 for US readers and $80.00 for international readers (including shipping), which buys you four book-length (120+ pages), perfect-bound issues of our grand stage for gay contemporary poetry. To subscribe to Assaracus, click HERE.

Purchase Individual or Back Issues: Assaracus is available from our online store, online retailers such as Amazon and Barnes and Noble, and several independent bookstores (like Giovanni’s Room in Philadelphia and Proud in Rehoboth Beach).

Libraries: Subscribe to Assaracus through our online store or your preferred subscription service (EBSCO, etc.). Purchase individual issues or back issues through our online store or Ingram’s wholesale channels.

Bookstores: Email us at info@siblingrivalrypress.com for wholesale rates or standing orders. All titles are returnable.

ISSUE 09 (January 2013 – COMING SOON)
Jeremy Brunger, Timothy Connor Dailey, Aaron DeLee, Red Haircrow, Andrew Ketcham, Thomas March, Rajiv Mohabir, Seth Pennington, Douglas Ray, Jason Roush, James J. Siegel.

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“To Die” A Poem by Hannah Senesh With Commentary & Memories

People ask me why, as a Native American, I have such an interest in Germany. They ask me, some after they’ve made a derogatory comment about the country, on why I choose to live here. And my reasons would probably be questioned and condemned by yet more others when I reference an occurence during WW2, an execution no less, as to why I always felt a connection. This extended to connected to those suffering the aftereffects, whatever nationality or race they are.

In my area where I grew up in the US after returning there from Germany, it was near a large military base which wasn’t as generally frequented by troops as it was more a specialist area, yet there were many wives and children who were attached to military men. There was one woman I knew, when I was about nine years old, who had married an American soldier shortly following the Allied takeover ofNazi Germany and its annexed territories. Though some think of Army (or other military wives as being so fortunate as liberated by Americans) she was a German who was Jewish who survived the war, but like many still today, people were ignorant and couldn’t differentiate between certain things: Nazi or German, or Jewish yet still German.

She married an American as a very young girl who’d lost all her family and moved to the US, yet her husband, whenever he was in his cups, which was frequent, chose to abuse her for her countrymen and their list of sins. Countrymen and women who had rejected her as being German based on a new regime’s declaration, along with the many Germans who were Jewish and had lived, worked and battled for Germany for hundreds of years.  The same ones who agree to have their own ethnically linked people who were declared unworthy, to then be destroyed.

When my Korean amah, who was herself an Army wife, used to visit this woman, they would talk. I remember the German Jewish woman with her heavily grey streaked brown hair and large brown eyes as she would try not to cry at first…but tears would soon stream down her face. I wasn’t supposed to move from my place or speak to interfere in adult conversation, but it hurt me so much because I wished to comfort her.  I wanted to understand more than I did, and this prompted me to begin my studies in 19th and 20th century Europe, especially Germany, and inevitably, it morphed into the Nazi states.

So, I live in Germany now, and though some people question how relevant the events of 70 years ago are still today? That is a question which is pertinent but obviously from someone who does not live in Germany. And even if they did, they might not fully understand any answers, unless they spoke German and had been trusted to listen to personal memories in a certain way. Or most especially even if they came into any sessions of any kind with preconceived ideas of guilt, even to descendants, without being willing to listen.

The film, “Hannah’s War” was released in 1988, the story of a Hungarian Jewess who lived through the rising horror, joined the resistance, yet eventually died from a firing squad after being captured as a paratrooper and valiantly refusing to give up pertinent information under extreme torture. We have films like Schindler’s List, Sophie’s War, and Life is Beautiful, all telling important, horrifically important stories, but don’t forget those like this young woman, or to read the journals and stories of those whose words survived, because for me…it is so…I can barely take a breath to consider it: there were millions upon millions of brillant, wonderful people who were murdered. One such as Hannah Senesh, also written Hannah Szenes and others depending on language.The world cannot reverse in time, but just consider that of those millions of millions in the Holocaust and wars of the 20th century, of those minds and people who might have studied and lived and produced cures for this or that disease; who might have brought a new age of Renaissance to mankind, but generations were wiped out!

Please visit the site Hannah Senesh for more poetry and do not think of such things as “past”, for  just like the Holocaust, the American Indian genocide is never past. With my own peoples and their cultures, not only in a way to see a people as inferior but also to steal the land they inhabited, as Ray Cook said in his article on ICTMN, the U.S. goverment “has refused to find a place in its history to accommodate the ones who gave the most to America’s existence, either by friendship or by force” finding themselves to be “selfish in its hunger, unreliable in keeping its agreements and disrespectful to those they don’t understand.”

Certainly I do not represent or support anyone, however connected to the events, to always seek some kind of compensation, especially monetary, but the fact is, especially in the case of the U.S. government they don’t acknowledge what they did and the damage it did and continues to do. This backs self-serving groups, especially hate or separatist groups or evolutionists who believe they are right in what they claim or try to enact.

Please read Hannah’s other poetry and the stories of others, of all races, all countries, both old and new and let it help you be a better person and human who cares to help others instead of just dismissing anyone or any group that doesn’t just believe and look like you do for whatever reason, even if you disagree with them for some reason. That’s what gotten our world into the state it is in.

To Die

To die… so young to die… no, no, not I.
I love the warm sunny skies,
Light, songs, shining eyes,
I want no war, no battle cry –
No, no…not I.
But if it must be that I live today
With blood and death on every hand,
Praised be He for the grace, I’ll say
To live, if I should die this day…
Upon your soil, my home, my land.

–Hannah Senesh

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NOW AVAILABLE for PRE-ORDER from SIBLING RIVALRY PRESS Virginia Bell’s “From the Belly”

“Imagine that things called color and taste and sex
-indeed the knotted thing called family
were a constant revelation…”

Ralph Hamilton, Editor of RHINO Magazine

* * *

$11.96 if pre-ordered!

$14.95; ISBN: 978-1-937420-23-9

6 x 9 Perfect-Bound Paperback; 68 Pages

Review Copies and Author Interviews Available
Publisher Telephone: (870) 723-6008
Publisher Email: info@siblingrivalrypress.com
Author Email: bluebellhome@sbcglobal.net

Author Hometown: Evanston, IL

Release Date: September 18, 2012

ABOUT THE BOOK

In From the Belly, Virginia Bell opens the doors to a gallery of poetic meditations – on the tenderness of childhood and motherhood, the primal pleasures of food and sex, and the joyful aches of family and memory. The poems are by turns ekphrastic and self-consciously confessional, taking inspiration from the art of everyday things.

Influenced by and suggested if you enjoy the following: Anne Carson’s Glass, Irony, and God; Mark Doty’s My Alexandria and School of the Arts; Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard; Elizabeth Alexander’s The Venus Hottentot; Lisel Mueller’s Alive Together; Louise Gluck’s The Wild Iris; Rita Dove’s Selected Poems; Emily Dickinson’s Selected Poems and Letters; Marie Howe’s What the Living Do; Christina Pugh’s Restoration; Ruth Stone’s Ordinary Words; Heather McHugh’s Hinge and Sign; Adrienne Rich’s Midnight Salvage; the photography of Sally Mann.

 

ADVANCE PRAISE

Chris Green, author of Epiphany School, says:  “Virginia Bell’s From the Belly is pure pleasure and expertise. Poetry about all home matters secret, scary, and sweet. The body and its generations, our food and art. Poems both comfortable and ominous folded in fine linen but spotted with blood. The book, like a series of intimate paintings and photographs, is perfectly stilled. Bell is never hurried, and the reader is aware throughout of her technical skill, love, common sense, vision, and magnificence.”

Alice George, author of This Must be the Place, says: “Like a painter who rejoices in the wrestle between abstraction and representation, Virginia Bell’s poems respect and illuminate their earthly triggers while transforming this world through an impressive craft and compression.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Virginia Bell’s poetry has appeared in CALYX, a Journal of Art and Literature by Women, The Mom Egg, Poet Lore, Pebble Lake Review, Wicked Alice, Ekphrasis, Contrary Magazine, Woman Made Gallery’s Her Mark: a Journal of Art and Poetry, and Beltway Poetry Quarterly, as well as in the anthologies Brute Neighbors: Urban Nature Poetry, Prose and Photography, and A Writers’ Congress: Chicago Poets on Barack Obama’s Inauguration. Bell has a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and has published articles on activist writers such as Eduardo Galeano and Leslie Marmon Silko, and also the Instructor’s Resource Manual for Beyond Borders: A Cultural Reader (Houghton Mifflin, 2003). She is an associate editor with RHINO Magazine and an adjunct professor at Loyola University Chicago, where she particularly enjoys teaching courses on Women in Literature and Early American Literature.

 

ABOUT THE PRESS

Located just outside of Little Rock, Arkansas, Sibling Rivalry Press develops, publishes, and promotes outlaw artistic talent. Our aim is to cultivate literary and poetic rock stars. We are also home to Assaracus, one of Library Journal‘s Best New Magazines.

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Between Eden And The Open Road by Philip Garber

Review: “Poetry is an expressive medium I would never choose to label good or bad, or even think of in such terms. It is subjective, and can be meaningful, but depending on who you ask, it may or may not have meaning for them personally. Some people look at the imagery, what they perceive as the message within the work, or how it compares to that which has been labeled great by critics over time, or dozens of other factors. I’m sure there is a list of how to rate and/or appreciate poetry out there somewhere, and I’ve taken a number of courses regarding such in college, but to me it’s individualistic. I never accept anyone else’s recommendations or protestations of worthy or lacking anyway, and especially not in poetry.

I liked the author’s dedication, “This book is for those to whom it speaks.” Based solely on that: there were some things that did not “speak” to me which were obviously intensely personal to the author, from a lifestyle and viewpoint very different from my own. There were other entries that did, such as “from my own weight,” a free form piece of personal reflection and analysis; or “this notion of participation” a comedic, yet triumphant expression of intelligent, adolescent defiance.

There were dialogues included in “that which causes me to react” that were cleverly indicative of conversations I’d similarly experienced so that I could readily identify with them. As a German speaker, some of the terms interspersed throughout “Between Eden” jumped out at me as being grammatically incorrect, and I thought different groupings of some phrases might have made it overall easier to understand and imagine, but in the end, the author wrote and used images and words as they felt necessary to express what they needed to express. That’s all that matters.

“Between Eden..” is made up of poetry and flash fiction suggestive of personal experiences that ably and perhaps inadvertently conveys the fact people can be quite different culturally, regarding sexuality and belief systems, yet there are commonalities between us that can be focused upon so as not to disassociate one from another across race, social class, nationality or anything else.

Varying in style and metre, subject and explicitness, some to none, “Between Eden And The Open Road” is the type of collection I would suggest for those with the willingness and ability to look at presentations of often ordinary circumstances of life that can still provide a profound “A-ha!” moment, or greater insight into their own life and ways of living.”

Description: “Teasingly mysterious, preposterously sparse, this collection of imperfect art populaire is brought to you in surrealist Technicolor. Read these small tales from the unconscious with unafraid eyes, when you’re barely tired or leading a life of sloth or on the threshold of maturity struggling to find a place outside yourself or if you’ve just woken up and can’t believe what’s become of your life.”

  • Published: June 23rd 2012
  • ISBN13: 9780615585864
  • Genre: Poetry, Flash Fiction, Literary Fiction
  • Availability: Amazon
  • Source: Author

Author Profile:

Philip Gaber currently lives and works in North Carolina. He spends the majority of his day attempting to reconcile differences between his conscious and subconscious. In his spare time he tries not to drift around his community as an invisible spirit or juggle more than a handful of moral dilemmas at a time.

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Filed under Literary fiction, Poetry, Reviews