Tag Archives: indigenous

“Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath” by Barbara Alice Mann (Seneca) in NAIS Vol.5.1 2018, University of Minnesota

Check out many other authors, books & Red Haircrow’s review of “Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath: The Twinned Cosmos of #Indigenous America” by Barbara Alice Mann (Seneca) in NAIS: Native American and Indigenous Studies’s latest journal, Vol.5.1 2018, at the University of Minnesota. Copies available here https://www.upress.umn.edu/journal-division/journals/nais

An excerpt from the two-page review: “Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath” is a collection of different and sometimes distinct indigenous perceptions, stories, legends and, while some people might call them myths, as in fiction, these are histories and explanations orally passed down that are believed true or are rooted in truth. As the aphorism states, “The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”  Yet this book is more than a systematic gathering of related information primarily on serpents and thunderbirds or sky and earth beings, none unique or forbidden because it is all available if you know where to look, and far more than a work detailing then condemning European proclivities, past or present.  It is correction by example, of misattribution, mislabeling, and at times a “blow-by-blow” timeline of western interference and biased disdain for actual native wisdom and realities, while conversely other Europeans appropriated and erased.”

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Filed under Anthologies, indigenous, Native American, Reviews

Call For Submissions – Native/Indigenous Film & Multimedia Screening Opportunity

In cooperation with Xart Splitta, we want to help showcase Native/indigenous films in Berlin, Germany through Fall/Winter 2018.

Main Themes for films or other multimedia projects by and about:

  • Native/indigenous women
  • GLBTIQ communities or two-spirit persons
  • contemporary themes and indigenous futurisms
  • decolonization of cuisine, culture, languages and traditions or environmental practices.

 

Discussion panels, workshops and lectures are planned. Filmmakers and artists don’t have to be on location in Berlin but would be very welcome. We can also arrange discussions via video chat. We are open to themes and compositions to accompany your films.

The purpose is for Natives to present and represent themselves and help educate on and lessen Native stereotypes and stereotyping through sharing their stories and experiences on their own terms.

The schedule is now being planned and will be finalized by August. The number of screenings and events will be based on the number of submissions.

Please contact us through our website form, including descriptions and links to your work, your availability and a short bio/profile. Also, if you have any questions, comments or suggestions.

 

About Us

Xart Splitta is a registered association for the empowerment and support of human rights, women’s issues, GLBTIQ and racial and ethnic equality, among others. https://www.xartsplitta.net/en/people-at-xart-splitta/

 

 

Red Haircrow is a writer, educator, filmmaker and chef of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African American heritage currently based in Berlin, who holds a BSc in Psychology, counsels selectively and is a Master’s student at MSU Bozeman, NAS. https://redhaircrow.com/  and Flying With Red Haircrow Productions.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Announcements, Films, GLBTIIQ, GLBTIIQ Interest, Native American, Workshops

“A Long Time Ago on a Reservation Far, Far Away”-Indigenous Pop Culture Conference, June 2nd

June 2nd at Saarland University,  Red Haircrow will be giving a presentation at the Indigenous Pop Culture conference, topic is native films and filmmakers and going beyond the stereotypical limitations of Hollywood or other non-Native industries by representation their cultures, peoples, history and future, fiction or non-fiction. Read more about the conference and participants at their website.

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Filed under Announcements, Culture, Films, Native American

AlterNative Volume 11 Issue 3 Available Now! #Indigenous #Worldviews

alternative
What is AlterNative?

AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal. We aim to present indigenous worldviews and scholarly research from native indigenous perspectives from around the world. AlterNative is published quarterly in print and online. AlterNative publishes papers that substantively address and critically engage with indigenous issues from a scholarly indigenous viewpoint. All papers must address and engage with current international and national literature and academic and/or indigenous theory and make a significant contribution to the field of indigenous studies.

The latest issue of AlterNative is now available online and in print. Highlights in this issue are two articles which focus on indigenous bereavement practices. Also notable is an article from Canada which looks at the health-seeking behaviour of Aboriginal youth in distress, as well as two articles which deal with settler-colonial practices of land alienation in the 19th century.

Enjoy FREE ACCESS to the lead article “It’s like going to a cemetery and lighting a candle”: Aboriginal Australians, Sorry Business and social media by Bronwyn Carlson and Ryan Frazer, until the end of September 2015. Click here to access the article.

Articles

“It’s like going to a cemetery and lighting a candle”: Aboriginal Australians, Sorry
Business and social media

Bronwyn Carlson & Ryan Frazer

Te waiata a Hinetitama—hearing the heartsong: Whakamate i roto i a Te Arawa—
A Māori suicide research project

Tepora Emery, Candy Cookson- Cox & Ngāmaru Raerino

Examining the relationship between attachment styles and resilience levels among
Aboriginal adolescents in Canada

Johanna Sam, Hasu Ghosh & Chris G. Richardson

Kaupapa Māori theory and critical discourse analysis: Transformation and
social change

Anne- Marie Jackson

Resisting racism: Māori experiences of interpersonal racism in Aotearoa
New Zealand

Sylvia Pack, Keith Tuffin & Antonia Lyons

Economic dysfunction or land grab? Assaults on the 19th-century Māori economy
and their Native North American parallels

Hazel Petrie

Hungry times: Food as a source of conflict between Aboriginal people and British
colonists in New South Wales 1804–1846

Greg Blyton

Book Reviews
Power lines: Phoenix and the making of the modern Southwest
James Rice

When rains became floods: A child soldier’s story
Marc Becker

Remaking Pacific pasts: History, memory, and identity in contemporary theatre from Oceania
Christopher Balme

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Filed under Announcements, Native American, Reviews