Tag Archives: flash fiction

Available Now: “Borough of Lost Boys” Series by Frankie Leone, Creative #Flash #NonFiction

b.o.l.b., vol. 1 -self hating egoist- COVER
GUERRILLA PUBLISHED AUTHOR/POET AND NOTORIOUS DOWNTOWN NIGHTCLUB PROMOTER RELEASES TEN PART SERIES OF FLASH CREATIVE NON-FICTION.

“Borough of Lost Boys” writer and NYC, USA nightlife figure Frankie Leone bares his soul.

Frankie Leone, Craigslist’s “Missed Connections” literary poster, “Borough of Lost Boys” writer /editor, and notorious downtown club promoter releases a ten part series of creative non-fiction collections illustrating a genuine character of New York City. All are available in paperback and Kindle ebook on Amazon.com. Staying true-to-form traditional publishing has been avoided and all titles are self-produced and self-published.
Readers of his books have expressed great enthusiasm for the project and have produced a viral social media response and an unusually high number of purchases and downloads for a venture of its nature.

“Frankie Leone’s words, like Rit dye, drip down in rainbows of darkness to tie dye your soul. Like Dali’s paintings, their surrealistic twists and turns add depth to your dream of reality. Each charcoal shaded stroke takes you deeper into his soul, your soul and the pain and passion you thought you erased when you showered. Read it in ‘Borough Of Lost Boys.'”Janr Ssor, Literary Blogger.

AUTHOR BIO:

Tries to write a version of his truth. Also a nightlife worker. Born at Beth Israel Hospital on 1st Ave between 16th and 17th St on December 15, 1984. Studied creative writing at Brooklyn College. Lives in Brooklyn, New York. Bears a few scars, tattoos, and regrets. Read more by viewing attached media, or at http://boroughoflostboys.com/.

Please direct all inquiries directly to the author at frankie@boroughoflostboys.com.

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Filed under Announcements, Books, Non-Fiction, Writers and Writing

Between Eden And The Open Road by Philip Garber

Review: “Poetry is an expressive medium I would never choose to label good or bad, or even think of in such terms. It is subjective, and can be meaningful, but depending on who you ask, it may or may not have meaning for them personally. Some people look at the imagery, what they perceive as the message within the work, or how it compares to that which has been labeled great by critics over time, or dozens of other factors. I’m sure there is a list of how to rate and/or appreciate poetry out there somewhere, and I’ve taken a number of courses regarding such in college, but to me it’s individualistic. I never accept anyone else’s recommendations or protestations of worthy or lacking anyway, and especially not in poetry.

I liked the author’s dedication, “This book is for those to whom it speaks.” Based solely on that: there were some things that did not “speak” to me which were obviously intensely personal to the author, from a lifestyle and viewpoint very different from my own. There were other entries that did, such as “from my own weight,” a free form piece of personal reflection and analysis; or “this notion of participation” a comedic, yet triumphant expression of intelligent, adolescent defiance.

There were dialogues included in “that which causes me to react” that were cleverly indicative of conversations I’d similarly experienced so that I could readily identify with them. As a German speaker, some of the terms interspersed throughout “Between Eden” jumped out at me as being grammatically incorrect, and I thought different groupings of some phrases might have made it overall easier to understand and imagine, but in the end, the author wrote and used images and words as they felt necessary to express what they needed to express. That’s all that matters.

“Between Eden..” is made up of poetry and flash fiction suggestive of personal experiences that ably and perhaps inadvertently conveys the fact people can be quite different culturally, regarding sexuality and belief systems, yet there are commonalities between us that can be focused upon so as not to disassociate one from another across race, social class, nationality or anything else.

Varying in style and metre, subject and explicitness, some to none, “Between Eden And The Open Road” is the type of collection I would suggest for those with the willingness and ability to look at presentations of often ordinary circumstances of life that can still provide a profound “A-ha!” moment, or greater insight into their own life and ways of living.”

Description: “Teasingly mysterious, preposterously sparse, this collection of imperfect art populaire is brought to you in surrealist Technicolor. Read these small tales from the unconscious with unafraid eyes, when you’re barely tired or leading a life of sloth or on the threshold of maturity struggling to find a place outside yourself or if you’ve just woken up and can’t believe what’s become of your life.”

  • Published: June 23rd 2012
  • ISBN13: 9780615585864
  • Genre: Poetry, Flash Fiction, Literary Fiction
  • Availability: Amazon
  • Source: Author

Author Profile:

Philip Gaber currently lives and works in North Carolina. He spends the majority of his day attempting to reconcile differences between his conscious and subconscious. In his spare time he tries not to drift around his community as an invisible spirit or juggle more than a handful of moral dilemmas at a time.

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Filed under Literary fiction, Poetry, Reviews