29 September – “Playing Indian” a Day of Discussions & Workshops at MARKK in Hamburg


On September 29, I’ll be joining Harmut Lutz (in our documentary, too) and others on the topic of “Playing Indian” at the Museum am Rothenbaum in Hamburg. I’ll be giving a workshop in the afternoon, which will include select scenes from Forget Winnetou- Loving in the Wrong Way. There is a full-day of discussions and events, please visit the webpage for the current list of participants and check back for updates in August!

Our focus, as ever, is on providing up-to-date, accurate information to help create and inspire positive change in society regarding representation and treatment of Indigenous and other POC, which aids in confronting and ending ableism, sexism and other discriminatory practices in western society.

Here’s a short description from the website, original German below.

“The work of educators, culture/museum mediators, teachers and educators in the German-speaking world is still touched by stereotypical ideas about Native Americans / First Nations: Be it the costumes at carnival times in kindergartens and schools, older literary works such as “Lederstrumpf” and the Winnetou books, current media productions such as the Yakari cartoons or visits to the Karl May Festival: All these practices and ideas leave their mark on educational work. In recent years, the clichés associated with them have been increasingly questioned and criticized – and with the social discourses that have emerged in this way, new challenges for educational work in museums, but also in kindergartens and schools, have arisen.

Under the title “Playing Indian”, borrowed from the classic book of the same name by the US-American author and Dakota Philip J. Deloria, a symposium is offered which is aimed at educators, teachers, museum mediators and educators. The event has three specific objectives: It explains the roots of the “Indian enthusiasm” in Germany in order to better understand phenomena such as today’s carnival costumes. The participants are introduced to diversity-oriented perspectives in the sense of decolonial pedagogy and can design new, contemporary options for action for their work practice under expert guidance.”


Die Arbeit von Erzieher*innen, Kultur/Museumsvermittler*innen, Lehrer*innen und Pädagog*innen im deutschsprachigen Raum wird nach wie vor von stereotypen Vorstellungen über Native Americans / First Nations berührt wird: Seien es die Kostümierungen zu Karnevalszeiten in Kindergärten und Schulen, ältere literarische Werke wie „Lederstrumpf“ und die Winnetou-Bücher, gegenwärtige Medienproduktionen wie die Yakari-Trickfilme oder Besuche der Karl-May-Festspiele: All diese Praktiken und Vorstellungen hinterlassen Spuren in der Bildungsarbeit. Damit verbundene Klischees werden in den letzten Jahren vermehrt hinterfragt und kritisiert – und mit den so aufkommenden gesellschaftlichen Diskursen entstehen neue Herausforderungen für die Bildungsarbeit in Museum, aber auch in den Kindergärten und Schulen.

Unter dem Titel „Playing Indian“ („Indianer spielen“), entliehen von dem gleichnamigen Buchklassiker des US-amerikanischen Autors und Dakota Philip J. Deloria , wird ein Fachtag angeboten, der sich an Pädagog*innen, Lehrer*innen, Museumsvermittler*innen und Erzieher*innen richtet. Der Termin verfolgt drei konkrete Zielsetzungen: Er klärt über die Wurzeln der „Indianerbegeisterung“ in Deutschland auf, um Phänomene wie die heutige Karnevalskostümierung besser einordnen zu können. Die Teilnehmenden werden an diversitätssensible Perspektiven im Sinne einer dekolonialen Pädagogik herangeführt und können unter fachkundiger Anleitung neue, zeitgemäße Handlungsmöglichkeiten für ihre Arbeitspraxis entwerfen.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.